Welcome to moviemarbles!

We do things a little differently here than you may be used to, so here is a quick tutorial of how our Blu-ray scorecards work.

Most review sites use a 1-5 star scoring system when reviewing Blu-ray releases. Due to the amount of detail contained in a review scorecard, we had to re-think the way to display our review ratings. Gone is the standardized “star” rating structure, replaced with a simple + or -.

So how do these + and - relate to the old-school star ratings? In our world, a + would be the equivalent to a 4 or 5 rating while a - would equate to a 1, 2 or 3 rating. So if a disc gets a + rating in one of the categories, you know it is top quality.

These +’s and -’s are then weighted (35% film, 25% audio, 25% video, 15% extras) to create an overall verdict of the disc, back in the common five-star rating system... it is quite a science.

Here are the terms used in our Blu-ray scorecard so you can get a better understanding of what each of our ratings mean...

Film

  • plot (story, flow)
  • acting (dialogue/believability)
  • sound (score/soundtrack/sound mixing)
  • visuals (special effects/costumes/set design/vibrancy/cinematography)
  • entertainment value (replay value, watchability)

Audio

  • fidelity (degree of accuracy with which sound is recorded or reproduced)
  • dynamic range (difference between the max level of distortion-free signal and the minimum limit)
  • dialogue (clarity and placement of voice activity)
  • bass (LFE) (low in pitch; of the lowest pitch or range)
  • soundstage (surround activity, sound movement through the different channels)

Video

  • transfer (lack of digital artifacts/noise/edge enhancements/compression artifacts)
  • image depth (dimension, 3D feel)
  • sharpness (lack of film grain, clarity of image, image detail)
  • color levels (color accuracy, vibrancy)
  • contrast (accurate deep black levels, range of brightness between the darkest/lightest elements)

Extras

We have taken a very simplified approach to the this section by informing which extras add value to a release and which are not worth your time. We have listed the most commonly valuable extras found on Blu-ray releases - featurettes, commentaries, deleted scenes (including outtakes and alternate endings), documentaries & digital extras (digital copy, bonus view, bd-live) - and if the extra is worth watching you will see a +, if the disc does not contain the extra or it is not worth watching you will see a -.

We are really changing the game here, so this new review format may take some getting used to... but I am sure you will come to realize that this new game is the way it should be played.

The Creeping Garden | reviewed by: William O'Donnell | May 25, 2017
  plot acting sound visuals entertainment value
film
  fidelity dynamic range dialogue bass soundstage
audio
  transfer image depth sharpness color levels contrast
video
  featurettes commentaries deleted scenes documentaries digital extras
extras
verdict
Soundtrack and a ton of other extras included. The archive footage looks as good as new (often better than some new clips).
genre Documentary
synopsis The Creeping Garden is an independently-produced feature-length documentary, directed by Tim Grabham and Jasper Sharp and with an original soundtrack by Jim O’Rourke, depicting the world of myxomycetes, or plasmodial slime moulds, and the diverse array of research currently being conducted around them. The film boasts stunning original macroscopic time-lapse footage of these overlooked organisms, filmed within its natural habitat and in a controlled laboratory setting, and features interviews with artists, researchers and scientists involved in the fields of the visual arts, music, mycology, computing and robotics to explore ideas of biological-inspired design, emergence theory, unconventional computing and scientific modelling.
lead actors
director Tim Grabham | Jasper Sharp